SBN-10: 1-55022-841-2
ISBN-13: 978-1-55022-841-0
6.75 x 9.75 in, 300pp, paperback
Published by ECW Press

 You can order Wrestling's Greatest Moments  online at sites such as amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.  You can also order a signed copy from me!  Signed copies are $19.95 +$2.99 for shipping.  Payment can be made via PayPal!  Email me mikerickardtwo@aol.com  for more information.
Every fan of professional wrestling remembers the moment that captured their heart forever and hooked them for life. Whether it was Ric Flair regaining the NWA Championship from Harley Race at Starcade, the Freebirds turning heel on Kerry Von Erich, Mick Foley flying off the cage at King of the Ring, , Samoa Joe's epic trilogy with CM Punk in Ring of Honor, or the premiere of WCW's Nitro: these are the matches and moments that thrilled, terrified, or outraged overwhelming you with real emotion.

Mike Rickard's Wrestling's Greatest Moments brings you all the most memorable and controversial moments from modern wrestling history. It's an insightful and essential compendium of thirty years' worth of groundbreaking matches, angles and interviews. From Hulkamania to the Montreal "screwjob," from the NWA to the nWo, you'll rediscover what really occurred in arenas and on the air worldwide, and learn all the backstage and behind-the-scenes secrets that made these highlight-reel moments possible from the men and women who were there.

Whether you watched Stone Cold Steve Austin point a gun at WWE honcho Vince McMahon's head, or stood outside the building as D-Generation X "invaded" WCW; whether you look back with nostalgia to "The King" slapping Andy Kaufman silly on Letterman or believe wrestling was better when Bruno sold out Shea; whether you were one of the Philadelphia "bingo hall" faithful who made ECW "extreme" or a casual observer of the Monday Night Wars; whether you're reliving these moments or discovering them for the first time, Wrestling's Greatest Moments will enthrall you with the exploits and extravagance, the tragedies and triumphs of the sport of kings.

About the Author:  Mike Rickard has been writing about the sport of kings since 2005.  His work has been seen on Pro Wrestling Illustrated's website, Pro Wrestling Torch, Gumgod, World Wrestling Insanity, and Canadian Bulldog's World.
        As 1990 began, Hulk Hogan reigned supreme as World Wrestling Federation (WWF) champion. However behind the scenes, the landscape of the WWF was changing. While Hulkamania had been a proven commodity during the Rock-n-Wrestling Era (1984-1989), WWF kingpin Vince McMahon was toying with the idea of placing a new figure as the promotion's standard-bearer.

        In 1989 the Hulkster had regained the WWF championship by defeating his former tag team partner "Macho Man" Randy Savage at Wrestlemania V. From there, Hogan started a program with actor Tony Lister (who had portrayed the character Zeus in Hogan's film vehicle No Holds Barred). Vince McMahon hoped that to capitalize on the anticipated success of the film and promote a series of matches between Lister (who wrestled as "Zeus") and Hogan, culminating in a main event match-up at Wrestlemania VI.

        Although No Holds Barred wasn't the spectacular success McMahon envisioned, he still ran with his program of Zeus vs. Hogan. Knowing Lister's inexperience in the ring, McMahon partnered him with Randy Savage and Hulk Hogan with Brutus "The Barber" Beefcake. The two teams would feud throughout the rest of the year with a cage match ending the feud in December. While the Hogan/Zeus program wasn't a dud, it clearly wasn't going to be the main event for the biggest show of the year.

        With Zeus out of the picture for Wrestlemania VI, McMahon looked for a new opponent for the Hulkster. He also began to consider changing course for his promotion. While Hulk Hogan was doing a good job as WWF champion, there were reasons why Vince McMahon wanted to go in a new direction. First off, he wanted to keep things fresh. While the WWF had a history of long title reigns for babyface champions, Hulk Hogan had held the WWF championship for five years (Andre the Giant had a brief reign followed by Randy "Macho Man" Savage's reign of nearly a year). As popular as Hogan was, all stars need a break. With the WWF promoting four PPV's a year, airing several weekly TV shows in syndication and on cable, and a recurring special on NBC (Saturday Night's Main Event), McMahon had to be thinking about whether or not he needed to freshen up his product.
        
     There were other factors at play as well. In his book Hollywood Hulk Hogan, the Hulkster says that he was tiring of being on the road constantly. Nagging injuries were starting to get the best of him. Other sources say that the Hulkster was looking to make more films.   With all of the appearances that the WWF champion made, a titleholder could not afford to miss months off of TV to film a movie.
        
     The Ultimate Warrior had proven to be a popular star ever since coming to the promotion. The WWF had two main event babyfaces with Hulk Hogan and the Ultimate Warrior with the capability of each man headlining shows on their own. If the Hulkster wanted to slow down his schedule (or even phase himself out of the WWF in order to move to Hollywood), it made sense to put the belt on someone who would work full-time.  

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