SBN-10: 1-55022-841-2
ISBN-13: 978-1-55022-841-0
6.75 x 9.75 in, 300pp, paperback
Published by ECW Press

 You can order Wrestling's Greatest Moments  online at sites such as amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com.  You can also order a signed copy from me!  Signed copies are $19.95 +$2.99 for shipping.  Payment can be made via PayPal!  Email me mikerickardtwo@aol.com  for more information.
Every fan of professional wrestling remembers the moment that captured their heart forever and hooked them for life. Whether it was Ric Flair regaining the NWA Championship from Harley Race at Starcade, the Freebirds turning heel on Kerry Von Erich, Mick Foley flying off the cage at King of the Ring, , Samoa Joe's epic trilogy with CM Punk in Ring of Honor, or the premiere of WCW's Nitro: these are the matches and moments that thrilled, terrified, or outraged overwhelming you with real emotion.

Mike Rickard's Wrestling's Greatest Moments brings you all the most memorable and controversial moments from modern wrestling history. It's an insightful and essential compendium of thirty years' worth of groundbreaking matches, angles and interviews. From Hulkamania to the Montreal "screwjob," from the NWA to the nWo, you'll rediscover what really occurred in arenas and on the air worldwide, and learn all the backstage and behind-the-scenes secrets that made these highlight-reel moments possible from the men and women who were there.

Whether you watched Stone Cold Steve Austin point a gun at WWE honcho Vince McMahon's head, or stood outside the building as D-Generation X "invaded" WCW; whether you look back with nostalgia to "The King" slapping Andy Kaufman silly on Letterman or believe wrestling was better when Bruno sold out Shea; whether you were one of the Philadelphia "bingo hall" faithful who made ECW "extreme" or a casual observer of the Monday Night Wars; whether you're reliving these moments or discovering them for the first time, Wrestling's Greatest Moments will enthrall you with the exploits and extravagance, the tragedies and triumphs of the sport of kings.

About the Author:  Mike Rickard has been writing about the sport of kings since 2005.  His work has been seen on Pro Wrestling Illustrated's website, Pro Wrestling Torch, Gumgod, World Wrestling Insanity, and Canadian Bulldog's World.
      Much has been said about Brock Lesnar's current run in World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE).   Some people question WWE kingpin Vince McMahon's decision to have Lesnar end the Undertaker's Wrestlemania unbeaten streak.   Others question Lesnar's sporadic appearances.   A related topic is whether the WWE is wise in booking Brock as WWE champion when his title defenses are months apart. 

     A lot has been said about these issues and while I'm sure that my analysis wouldn't be redundant, I'd like to focus more on the historical aspect of world title defenses and whether there is a precedent for long periods of time between title defenses.  

        Old school fans remember the traditional rule that titles had to be defended at least once every 30 days (basically once a month).   That applied to all titles whether it was a TV title, a tag team belt, or a world championship.   If a champion failed to defend the title within 30 days, they were stripped of the title.   This stipulation served as a safeguard for a promotion in the event a wrestler left without dropping the belt.   It could also be used to get a belt off of a wrestler without them losing in the ring.   For example a wrestler could suffer a kayfabe injury and be stripped of the belt, setting up a future program where they chased the new champion.

        Like most things in life, professional wrestling has changed over the decades.    Before the days of pay-per-view (PPV), world champions typically defended their titles at house shows.   About the only time you saw a title defense on TV was when a promotion showed highlights of a title changing hands.   I can recall back in the early 1980's when Harley Race defeated "Nature Boy" Ric Flair for the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) World championship.   Jim Crockett Promotions (JCP) aired highlights of the title switch.   Another time was when Hulk Hogan defeated the Iron Sheik for the World Wrestling Federation (WWF) championship.  The WWF aired the match several times in order to hype the dawning of Hulkamania in the WWF.

      READ MORE

Contact Mike Rickard

Archives

Favorite Links
Recent Blogs

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 17

Invisible Champions Part 2 of 2-Think Brock Lesnar is the first champion to ignore the 30 dy rule?  Think again.

Invisible Champions Part 1 of 2-Think Brock Lesnar is the first champion to ignore the 30 day rule? Think again.

Origins of the Big Four Part 2 of 2

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 16

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 15

Origins of the Big Four Part 1 of 2

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 14

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 13

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 12

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 11

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 10

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 9

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 8

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 7

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 6

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 5

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 4

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan  Part 3

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan Part 2

The Enduring Legacy of Hulk Hogan

The Wit and Wisdom of Captain Lou Albano

Those Amazing Jobbers

Frankie Pays the Piper

Creation of the Clash